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We encourage you to contact us with any questions or concerns.

Burke Library - 3rd Floor
helpdesk@hamilton.edu

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859-4185 - fax

Video Support Models

Generalized Models of Video Support

Instructional Technologists will work with you to develop a video workflow that meets your project needs.  The following  models  are generalized examples offered as a starting point for discussion. 

Analytical Assignment Model

Creating clips from existing footage, moving images in support of or to illustrate a theme. Clips captured from commercially produced films to support oral presentations, oral presentations using PowerPoint with embedded video, and video for web pages, are all examples of assignments we have supported in this general category.  Each different final delivery method (ex. DVD or web video) requires tailoring of the basic video workflow, dictates how we allocate resources, and is important for playback.   

  • Generalized Analytical Video Timeline:
    • Faculty are invited to a coordinated support meeting with members of HILLgroup to plan their project and develop a timeline.
    • We then work with Faculty as they create a model of the video project they have assigned to their students.  This step helps tailor the learning experience to the learning goals and helps the professor develop evaluation criteria for the final projects.
    • Each planned video project will also include the following support from ITS:
    • Video Storage until resources are fully committed
    • MPC Storage Account Appointments
    • Video Basics Workshop
    • Presentation Trial and Support 


Original Footage Assignment

Original footage video projects are those in which students shoot their own video.  We loan miniDV digital video cameras for students to shoot their own original footage. Students must purchase their own miniDV tapes.
Examples of assignments we have supported in this general category include:  Videos shot and produced from original storyboards based on an original creative concept or as an adaptation.  The learning goals of  original footage projects range from demonstration of an understanding of another language and/or culture to creative artistic expression.   Students have produced:  documentaries incorporating original and analytical components, edit through the camera shorts, original adaptations of scenes from commercially produced films, content specific commercials, foreign language projects demonstrating language proficiency and cultural sensitivity, video art, multimedia installations, and collaborative performance art.

  • Generalized Original Video Timeline:
    • Faculty are invited to a coordinated support meeting with members of HILLgroup to plan their project and develop a timeline.
    • We then work with Faculty as they  create a model of the video project they have assigned to their students.  This step helps tailor the learning experience to the learning goals and helps the professor develop evaluation criteria for the final projects.
  • Each planned video project will also include the following support from ITS:
    • Video Storage until resources are fully committed
    • MPC Storage Account Appointments
    • Video Basics Workshop
    • Presentation Trial and Support

The timeline, information covered, and resources necessary to support either analytical or original footage assignments vary significantly with the specific goals of the faculty member and their course. 

Definitions of Planned Support Events

Videography & Language of Film Workshop

In this workshop, students learn universal camera settings (audio bit rates, record mode),camera angles, and basic language of film.  We begin by viewing a few short video projects and discussing the visual, aural, and temporal elements.  Formal deconstruction of these elements is tied back to basic language of film and design of multimodal communications. Analytical and creative components of media literacy are woven into the deconstruction of a video. 
In hands-on sessions following the discussion, students learn the basics of storyboarding and planning a video project, univeral camera settings, framing & composition, camera angles, and editing through the camera.

 
MPC Storage Account Appointments

Prior to the Video Basics Workshop, students will learn how to access specially created video storage accounts and how to move their files between these server spaces and our public lab facilities.
Lack of understanding of file structure and how to manage files between a storage account and authoring areas is one of our most frequently encountered "gotchas".   The type of video project, total final length, and who will be editing it, affect how we can set up storage accounts for students.  Accounts for students working in groups, for example, must  be set up differently from those for individual projects.


Video Basics Workshop

In this workshop, students receive an overview of video editing and instruction on how to compress and deliver their video project. Students benefit most from the video basics workshop when all or most of their footage is captured before attending.  At that point, they have a concrete idea of what they might be able to do with their footage  and have the opportunity to ask their specific editing questions. Even though we have standardized on apple video editing software and Quicktime for delivery. students who have taken our workshops in the past need to understand and/or review the recommendations and procedures for video authoring each semester. Updates to QuickTime software and the editing software can effect using imported graphics, audio, and voice-overs and microphone audio.  And, the formats of imported files must be compatible with both the editing and compressing software used. There are also technical considerations associated with compression formats that may be dependent upon the characteristics of the footage being used.

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